Menopause snoring is a frustrating and often unaddressed issue for women. After menopause, snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia and other sleep disorders become far more commonplace for post-menopausal women.

Fact: Post menopausal women are less satisfied with the quality of their sleep, and as many as 61% report insomnia symptoms.*

For women who struggle with hot flashes, bedtime can become a nightmare (no pun intended) …a nightly battle with your body that you just cannot win. Sweating, dozing, waking, covers on, covers off…clothes on, clothes off…morning brings no relief or rest, and the stress is cumulative. Not good.

Even if you have never snored before, you may find that you begin snoring after menopause. In fact, although men snore twice as much as women pre-menopause, women quickly catch up after menopause and the numbers begin to equalize. This onset is due to a number of factors, which combined can not only make you tired and irritable, but can even affect your relationship with your spouse or significant other. Sounds extreme, but it’s actually quite common.

Tips for Menopause Snoring

Talk to your doctor. If you are struggling with sleep, not getting rest, ask your doctor for help. There can be a lot of reasons for increased snoring as we age, so make sure you get a check-up and cover all the bases.

Get checked for sleep apnea. Loud snoring, constant fatigue and irritability may indicate sleep apnea. Contact a sleep specialist who will conduct a sleep study to determine what’s happening while you’re sleeping.

Raise the head of your bed. Raising the head of your bed a few inches can actually help by preventing your tongue from blocking your throat. Just 4″-5″ can relieve pressure on your airway and reduce snoring.

Weight loss. Excess weight gain during and after menopause can create fatty tissue in the neck and throat which, when relaxed during sleep, can cause obstructions in the airway . If you have gained significant weight, it can play a part, so eat right, get some exercise and make healthy your new state of mind!

Change sleep positions. Sleeping on your back can increase snoring. If you regularly sleep on your back, change positions and try sleeping on your side. There are a number of ways to force yourself to sleep on your side if it isn’t something you can do naturally. Some of the techniques you can try: putting a large object or body pillow in the middle of your bed, sleep with your back against the wall, sew a tennis ball to the front or back of your sleepwear, or try using a side sleep pillows.

 

Resources:

  • *https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/menopause-and-sleep
  • http://www.webmd.com/women/features/does-snoring-have-you-up-all-night#1

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